Coronavirus pandemic: Tracking the global outbreak

School pupil in Japan wears a face shield Image copyright Getty Images

Coronavirus is continuing its spread across the world, with more than 6.5 million confirmed cases in 188 countries. Nearly 400,000 people have lost their lives.

This series of maps and charts tracks the global outbreak of the virus since it emerged in China in December last year.

How many cases and deaths have there been?

The virus, which causes the respiratory infection Covid-19, was first detected in the city of Wuhan, China, in late 2019.

It then spread quickly across the globe in the first months of 2020.

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Confirmed cases around the world

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Source: Johns Hopkins University, national public health agencies

Figures last updated 5 June 2020, 16:54 BST

Note: The map and table in this page use a different source for figures for France from that used by Johns Hopkins University, which results in a slightly lower overall total.

The US has by far the largest number of cases, almost one third of the global total, according to figures collated by Johns Hopkins University. It also has the world's highest death toll, followed by the UK and Brazil.

In Europe, Italy, France and Spain have also been badly hit.

In China, the official death toll is some 4,600 from about 84,000 confirmed cases, although critics have questioned whether the country's official numbers can be trusted.

data in detail

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*Deaths per 100,000 people

US 108,126 33.1 1,870,532
UK 40,261 60.0 283,311
Brazil 34,021 16.2 614,941
Italy 33,689 55.6 234,013
France 29,065 44.7 152,444
Spain 27,133 58.1 240,660
Mexico 12,545 9.9 105,680
Belgium 9,566 83.3 58,907
Germany 8,645 10.4 184,924
Iran 8,134 9.9 167,156
Canada 7,717 20.8 95,269
India 6,393 0.5 230,113
Netherlands 6,005 35.2 47,159
Russia 5,520 3.8 449,256
Peru 5,031 15.7 183,198
China 4,638 0.3 84,174
Turkey 4,630 5.6 167,410
Sweden 4,562 45.7 41,883
Ecuador 3,486 20.4 40,966
Switzerland 1,921 22.5 30,936
Pakistan 1,838 0.9 89,249
Indonesia 1,770 0.7 29,521
Ireland 1,664 34.5 25,142
Portugal 1,465 14.3 33,969
Chile 1,356 7.2 118,292
Romania 1,308 6.7 20,103
Colombia 1,142 2.3 35,240
Poland 1,127 3.0 25,177
Egypt 1,126 1.1 29,767
Philippines 987 0.9 20,626
Japan 913 0.7 16,955
South Africa 848 1.5 40,792
Bangladesh 811 0.5 60,391
Ukraine 770 1.7 26,542
Algeria 681 1.6 9,831
Austria 672 7.6 16,843
Saudi Arabia 642 1.9 95,748
Argentina 615 1.4 20,197
Denmark 586 10.2 11,875
Hungary 542 5.6 3,970
Dominican Republic 520 4.9 18,319
Bolivia 415 3.7 12,245
Panama 363 8.7 15,044
Sudan 333 0.8 5,714
Czech Republic 326 3.1 9,494
Nigeria 323 0.2 11,516
Finland 322 5.8 6,941
Moldova 317 7.8 9,018
Afghanistan 309 0.8 18,969
Israel 291 3.5 17,562
Iraq 285 0.7 9,846
United Arab Emirates 273 2.8 37,018
South Korea 273 0.5 11,668
Belarus 259 2.7 46,868
Serbia 247 3.5 11,667
Kuwait 244 5.9 30,644
Honduras 243 2.5 5,880
Norway 238 4.5 8,510
Morocco 208 0.6 8,030
Cameroon 205 0.8 7,392
Armenia 183 6.2 11,817
Greece 180 1.7 2,952
Bulgaria 159 2.3 2,627
Bosnia and Herzegovina 159 4.8 2,606
Guatemala 158 0.9 6,154
North Macedonia 149 7.2 2,790
Malaysia 116 0.4 8,266
Luxembourg 110 18.2 4,027
Slovenia 109 5.2 1,479
Croatia 103 2.5 2,247
Yemen 103 0.4 453
Australia 102 0.4 7,251
Mali 85 0.4 1,461
Cuba 83 0.7 2,119
DR Congo 81 0.1 3,764
Kenya 79 0.2 2,474
Somalia 79 0.5 2,204
Azerbaijan 78 0.8 6,522
Oman 72 1.5 15,086
Lithuania 71 2.5 1,694
Estonia 69 5.2 1,910
Chad 66 0.4 828
Niger 65 0.3 963
Thailand 58 0.1 3,102
El Salvador 53 0.8 2,849
Burkina Faso 53 0.3 885
Kazakhstan 52 0.3 12,312
Andorra 51 66.2 852
Haiti 50 0.4 2,640
Qatar 49 1.8 65,495
Tunisia 49 0.4 1,087
Tajikistan 48 0.5 4,370
Sierra Leone 47 0.6 929
Nicaragua 46 0.7 1,118
Channel Islands 46 27.0 561
Senegal 45 0.3 4,155
San Marino 42 124.3 678
Mauritania 39 0.9 784
Ghana 38 0.1 8,885
Ivory Coast 35 0.1 3,262
Albania 33 1.1 1,212
Kosovo 30 1.6 1,142
Liberia 30 0.6 334
Slovakia 28 0.5 1,526
Lebanon 28 0.4 1,312
Djibouti 26 2.7 4,054
Mayotte 25 9.6 2,058
Latvia 25 1.3 1,085
Singapore 24 0.4 37,183
Isle of Man 24 28.5 336
Guinea 23 0.2 3,991
Uruguay 23 0.7 832
Bahrain 22 1.4 13,733
Kyrgyzstan 22 0.3 1,936
New Zealand 22 0.5 1,504
Gabon 21 1.0 2,955
Tanzania 21 0.0 509
Venezuela 20 0.1 2,087
Congo 20 0.4 611
Ethiopia 19 0.0 1,805
Cyprus 17 1.4 958
Uzbekistan 16 0.0 3,987
Saint Martin 15 40.3 77
Martinique 14 3.7 200
Guadeloupe 14 3.5 162
Georgia 13 0.3 805
Diamond Princess cruise ship 13 712
Togo 13 0.2 465
Equatorial Guinea 12 0.9 1,306
Sao Tome and Principe 12 5.7 485
Guyana 12 1.5 153
Nepal 11 0.0 2,912
Sri Lanka 11 0.1 1,800
Paraguay 11 0.2 1,086
Bahamas 11 2.9 102
Iceland 10 3.0 1,806
Costa Rica 10 0.2 1,194
South Sudan 10 0.1 994
Jamaica 10 0.3 591
Mauritius 10 0.8 337
Jordan 9 0.1 765
Malta 9 2.0 625
Montenegro 9 1.4 324
Bermuda 9 14.3 141
Guinea-Bissau 8 0.4 1,339
Trinidad and Tobago 8 0.6 117
Maldives 7 1.4 1,872
Zambia 7 0.0 1,089
Madagascar 7 0.0 975
Taiwan 7 0.0 443
Barbados 7 2.4 92
Myanmar 6 0.0 236
Syria 6 0.0 124
Cape Verde 5 0.9 502
Libya 5 0.1 209
Central African Republic 4 0.1 1,288
Malawi 4 0.0 393
Zimbabwe 4 0.0 237
Monaco 4 10.3 99
Angola 4 0.0 86
Palestinian Territories 3 0.1 464
Eswatini 3 0.3 300
Benin 3 0.0 261
Aruba 3 2.8 101
Antigua and Barbuda 3 3.1 26
Rwanda 2 0.0 410
Mozambique 2 0.0 352
Brunei 2 0.5 141
Comoros 2 0.2 132
Belize 2 0.5 18
MS Zaandam cruise ship 2 9
French Guiana 1 0.4 589
Réunion 1 0.1 479
Cayman Islands 1 1.6 160
Liechtenstein 1 2.6 82
Suriname 1 0.2 82
Burundi 1 0.0 63
Botswana 1 0.0 40
Gambia 1 0.0 26
Cura?ao 1 0.6 21
Turks and Caicos Islands 1 2.7 12
Montserrat 1 20.0 11
Western Sahara 1 0.2 9
British Virgin Islands 1 3.4 8
Uganda 0 0.0 557
Vietnam 0 0.0 328
Mongolia 0 0.0 191
Faroe Islands 0 0.0 187
Gibraltar 0 0.0 174
Cambodia 0 0.0 125
French Polynesia 0 0.0 60
Bhutan 0 0.0 48
Eritrea 0 0.0 39
St Vincent and the Grenadines 0 0.0 26
Namibia 0 0.0 25
Timor-Leste 0 0.0 24
Grenada 0 0.0 23
New Caledonia 0 0.0 20
Laos 0 0.0 19
Saint Lucia 0 0.0 19
Dominica 0 0.0 18
Fiji 0 0.0 18
Saint Kitts and Nevis 0 0.0 15
Greenland 0 0.0 13
Falkland Islands 0 0.0 13
Vatican 0 0.0 12
Seychelles 0 0.0 11
Papua New Guinea 0 0.0 8
Saint Barthelemy 0 0.0 6
Lesotho 0 0.0 4
Anguilla 0 0.0 3

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This information is regularly updated but may not reflect the latest totals for each country.

** The past data for new cases is a three day rolling average. Due to revisions in the number of cases, an average cannot be calculated for this date.

Source: Johns Hopkins University, national public health agencies and UN population data

Figures last updated: 5 June 2020, 16:54 BST

The outbreak was declared a global pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO) on 11 March. This is when an infectious disease is passing easily from person to person in many parts of the world at the same time.

The WHO has warned that the pandemic is a long way from being over and said people should be prepared for new outbreaks to build up very quickly - especially in areas where lockdowns are eased.

The true number of cases is thought to be much higher than the reported figures, as many of those with milder symptoms have not been tested and counted.

Globally, at least 4.5 billion people - half the world's population - have been living under social distancing measures, according to the AFP news agency's estimates.

Those restrictions have had a big impact on the global economy, with the International Monetary Fund warning the world faces the worst recession since the Great Depression of the 1930s.

The United Nations World Food Programme has also warned that the pandemic could almost double the number of people suffering acute hunger.

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Where are coronavirus cases still rising?

While some countries are starting to see confirmed cases and deaths fall following strict lockdown restrictions, others are still seeing figures rise.

A sharp increase in cases in Latin America in the second half of May led the WHO to say the Americas were at the centre of the pandemic. But there have also been new spikes in Africa, Asia and the Middle East.

These charts show four countries where deaths are still on an upward trajectory - as shown by the red lines.

There is particular concern about the situation in Brazil, where President Jair Bolsonaro has compared contracting the virus to having "the sniffles".

There are now more than 600,000 cases in Brazil and around 35,000 people have died, according to official figures. In the same week that the number of deaths in one day twice hit record levels, Mr Bolsonaro said death was the destiny of everyone, and blamed the media for stirring panic.

Brazil's death toll could exceed 125,000 by early August, according to a projection by experts at the University of Washington.

Several other countries in Latin America are seeing widespread outbreaks, including Peru, Mexico, Chile and Ecuador.

Elsewhere, Russia has seen infections rise rapidly in recent weeks, but is easing some lockdown restrictions.

India has also seen infections spike and Iran shows signs of a second wave of infections.

South Africa, Egypt and Nigeria have seen the largest outbreaks in Africa.

South Korea, which appeared to have brought its outbreak under control with an extensive "track, trace and treat" programme, has been forced to reintroduce some restrictions after a small spike in cases.

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Europe easing lockdown restrictions

In Europe, the UK, Italy, Spain and France, along with others, now appear to have passed the peak, with the number of new confirmed cases and deaths falling.

The UK has reported almost 40,000 coronavirus deaths, the highest number in Europe. Italy has had the second highest death toll with 33,000, while both France and Spain are just below 30,000.

However, differences in population size and how countries report their figures, with some including deaths in care homes, or deaths of those suspected but not confirmed of having the virus, means international comparisons are complicated.

Having been on lockdown to control the spread of the virus, European countries are now beginning to ease restrictions.

How and when restrictions are lifted varies from country to country, but the WHO has urged all nations to adopt a "slow, steady" approach.

Sweden did not impose a lockdown, although it has encouraged some social distancing measures, and appears to have suffered a far higher number of deaths than its neighbours.

Latest figures show Sweden has recorded about 4,500 deaths. Denmark has had 580 deaths and restricted travel across the Oresund bridge, which connects the two countries. Norway and Finland have both recorded death tolls below 500.

However, as in the rest of Europe, new virus cases in Sweden are now falling.

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New York the worst-hit in US outbreak

With more than 1.8 million cases, the US has the highest number of confirmed infections in the world. It has also recorded over 105,000 deaths.

The state of New York has been particularly badly affected, with about 30,000 deaths in total, but the number of daily deaths has now dropped to fewer than 100 - down from 1,000 a day in early April.

At one point, more than 90百分比 of the US population was under mandatory lockdown orders, but all 50 states have now begun to loosen their stay-at-home restrictions and allowed some businesses to reopen - a move health officials fear could further spread the virus.

While the rate of new cases is now declining in many states, in others - including California, and several south-eastern states - it is still rising.

And mass protests against police brutality following the death of George Floyd have led to warnings from public health experts that crowds gathering could cause a further resurgence.

The latest figures show more than 42 million people have lost their jobs since the outbreak hit the US - a quarter of the American workforce.

The rise means the jobless rate is now worse than at any time since the Great Depression of the 1930s.

About this data

The data used on this page comes from a variety of sources. It includes figures collated by Johns Hopkins University, data from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, national governments and health agencies, as well as UN data on populations.

When comparing figures from different countries it is important to bear in mind that not all governments are recording coronavirus cases and deaths in the same way. This makes like for like comparisons between countries difficult.

Other factors to consider include: different population sizes, the size of the a country's elderly population or whether a particular country has a large amount of its people living in densely populated areas. In addition, countries may be in different stages of the pandemic.

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